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Where Is Marijuana Legal? A State-by-State Guide

In the United States, the situation with marijuana legalization remains somewhat complex. While marijuana is now recreationally legal in some parts of the country, these laws are created on a state-by-state basis. Marijuana still remains federally illegal.

Adding further confusion is numerous differing regulations for medical marijuana across the country, with some states supporting advanced medical programs and others still placing complex restrictions on which marijuana products can be used. As with recreational marijuana, individual states are free to define their own medical marijuana policy.

Not to worry! We’re here to help sort out the confusion. Below you’ll find a complete state-by-state guide which covers the details on the legality of marijuana in all fifty states

Let’s take a look.

States with Legalized Recreational Marijuana

As of this writing (September 2019,) 11 states (as well as Washington D.C.) have legalized recreational marijuana. In these states, you can legally purchase marijuana products from licensed dispensaries.

Recreational usage means you don’t need any kind of permit to purchase, possess, or consume marijuana products. You just need to be of age (21+ years old.)

 

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Nevada
  • Oregon
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Washington D.C.

 

States with Legalized Medical Marijuana

As of this writing (September 2019,) 33 states have legalized medical marijuana programs. 

Medical marijuana is more restrictive than recreational marijuana, requiring you to obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician which enables you to purchase marijuana products from medical dispensaries. 

Medical marijuana states have more restrictions than recreational states, often putting tight limits on the amount of marijuana and the type of marijuana products which medical users are allowed to possess. Be sure to research and understand the regulations for your local medical marijuana program.

 

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Washington, DC
  • West Virginia

 

Is Marijuana Legal in My State? A Complete State-by-State Guide

Wondering what the laws look like in your state? We’ve broken down the situation for all fifty states.

Alabama

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Marijuana remains illegal in Alabama. The state’s lawmakers have shown little interest in legalizing marijuana recreationally or expanding the state’s limited medical marijuana program.

While medical marijuana in the form of smokable flowers and concentrate remains illegal, Alabama’s laws do allow doctors to approve residents for medical marijuana permits which can be used to purchase CBD products with up to 3% THC. This represents the only form of legal cannabis available to Alabama residents.

 

Alaska

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Marijuana is legal both recreationally and medically in Alaska. No permit is required to purchase or possess marijuana. You must be over 21 and present a valid government ID to purchase marijuana at a licensed dispensary.

Alaskan residents are allowed to legally cultivate their own marijuana plants. Each resident is allowed to cultivate three flowering and three vegetating plants simultaneously with no permits necessary.

 

Arizona

  • Recreational Use: Ilegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Medical marijuana is legal in Arizona. However, possessing marijuana without a medical license remains a felony in the state, with maximum penalties of 1.5 years in jail and exorbitant fines. 

The medical marijuana industry in Arizona is one of the largest in the country, with upwards of 100 medical dispensaries active. Arizona has seen a strong push to legalize recreational marijuana, with many viewing the state as a likely candidate for legalization.

 

Arkansas

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Despite having legalized medical marijuana, intense restrictions have limited the number of dispensaries in Arkansas. The state currently has less than 40 medical dispensaries. Arkansas residents can obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician, allowing them to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana.

For those without a medical marijuana permit, Arkansas’ laws make possession of up to 4 ounces of marijuana a Class A misdemeanor which can result in up to a year in prison.

 

California

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

California has often led the country in marijuana legalization, beginning with the country’s first legalized medical program back in 1996. Although California lagged behind Colorado and Washington state for recreational legalization, recreational marijuana was legalized in California in 2016 and the first recreational dispensaries opened their doors in 2018.

No permit is required to purchase marijuana products in California. You must be over 21 and present a valid government ID to purchase marijuana from a dispensary. You may possess up to 28.5 grams of marijuana flowers and up to 8 grams of concentrate products in California.

 

Colorado

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

In 2012, Colorado (along with Washington state) became among the first states to legalize recreational marijuana. This move made Colorado one of the top marijuana tourism destinations in the world and has brought hundreds of millions of dollars in tax revenue to the state.

You may legally purchase as much as an ounce of marijuana from one of Colorado’s many legal recreational dispensaries with no permit. You must be over 21 and present a valid government ID as proof of your age.

Colorado residents may cultivate up to six marijuana plants, with a maximum of three flowering at any time.

 

Connecticut

  • Recreational Use: Decriminalized
  • Medical Use: Legal

Connecticut’s medical marijuana program allows residents to be approved by a doctor to obtain up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana each month from one of the state’s many licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. 

While recreational marijuana remains illegal in Connecticut, possession has been decriminalized. This means that rather than facing jail time, those caught in possession of a half ounce or less marijuana receive a civil penalty or small fine, or sometimes simply have their marijuana confiscated.

 

Delaware

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Partially decriminalized) 
  • Medical Use: Legal

Delaware residents can obtain a medical marijuana permit from licensed physicians, allowing them to possess up to six ounces of marijuana which can be purchased from one of the state’s plentiful medical marijuana dispensaries.

Recreational use remains illegal, but it has been “partially” decriminalized, meaning you won’t face jail time if caught in possession of one ounce or less marijuana. Instead, you can face civil penalties and a maximum fine of $500.

 

Florida

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Recreational marijuana remains illegal in Florida, with few efforts to push legalization. However, the state’s medical program — though originally set back by unnecessarily complex legislation — now allows residents to be prescribed a medical permit by licensed physicians, enabling them to receive up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana flower each month.

However, the situation for medical marijuana remains complex in Florida, with a small number of dispensaries and some patients encountering serious difficulties obtaining medical marijuana permits.

Those caught in possession of marijuana without a medical permit in Florida can face up to a year in jail or a fine of $1,000. Those in possession of 20 grams or more can face up to 4 years in jail or a fine of $4,000.

 

Georgia

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Smokable marijuana remains illegal across the board in Georgia, with lawmakers showing little interest in legalizing a medical or recreational program. However, cities including Atlanta and Clarkston have decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana within city limits.

CBD products containing up to 5% THC can be recommended by doctors for patients with medical marijuana permits, representing Georgia’s only form of legalized cannabis products. 

Possession of an ounce of less of marijuana in Georgia is punishable by up to a year in jail or a fine of $1,000.

 

Hawaii

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized starting 2020) 
  • Medical Use: Legal

Hawaii has a generous medical marijuana program which allows residents to obtain medical marijuana permits from a licensed physician. This permit allows them to possess up to four ounces of marijuana and cultivate up to seven marijuana plants, as well as purchase marijuana from licensed medical dispensaries.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal in Hawaii, however possession of up to 3 grams will be decriminalized as of 2020, removing the possibility of jail time and imposing a maximum fine of $130. 

 

Idaho

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal 

Idaho’s hardline policy on marijuana seems unlikely to change anytime soon. Both recreational and medical use remain illegal in the state, with lawmakers even fighting efforts to legalize CBD products for certain medical conditions.

Possession of up to 3 ounces of marijuana remains a misdemeanor in Idaho and can result in up to a year in jail or a fine of as much as $1,000.

 

Illinois

  • Recreational Use: Legal (in 2020) – Decriminalized
  • Medical Use: Legal

Illinois passed legislation in May 2019 to legalize recreational marijuana. However, this will not go into effect until January 1st, 2020. After that date, recreational dispensaries will be able to operate in the state and individuals over the age of 21 may possess up to 30 grams. 

Until then, possession of marijuana remains decriminalized. Possession of 10 ounces or less carries a maximum fine of $200.

Illinois’ medical marijuana program allows residents to obtain a medical permit from a licensed physician and purchase up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana in a 35-day period.

 

Indiana

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Marijuana remains illegal both recreationally and medically in Indiana. Indiana’s lawmakers have shown little interest in legalization efforts and Indiana remains one of the few states to have no form of medical marijuana program at all.

After the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into federal law, Indiana passed their own legislation allowing the sale and use of CBD products with 0.3% THC or less, putting the state in line with new federal regulations. This is the only form of legal cannabis product in Indiana.

Possession of marijuana in Indiana is a misdemeanor and can result in up to 180 days in jail of a fine of up to $1,000.

 

Iowa

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Limited Legal (CBD Products Only)

Iowa, despite passing a medical marijuana bill, still has very tight restrictions for its medical program which only allows the use of cannabis oils such as CBD tinctures with a THC content of 3% or less. All forms of smokable marijuana remain illegal. The state issues few medical permits and has a limited number of dispensaries.

Marijuana possession of less than 50 kilograms remains a felony punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

 

Kansas

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal

Kansas is one of the few states where marijuana remains totally illegal, offering no medical program and little hope of legislators approving recreational marijuana any time soon.

However, in response to the 2018 Farm Bill, Kansas removed CBD from its definition of marijuana. This allows the sale and use of hemp derived CBD products with 0.3% or less THC content.

Possession of marijuana is a misdemeanor in Kansas, with a maximum punishment of six months in jail or a fine of up to $1,000.

 

Kentucky

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Kentucky offers a limited medical marijuana program which enables sufferers of specific conditions to use CBD products prescribed by a doctor.

No recreational marijuana is available in Kentucky and seems unlikely to be introduced any time soon. However, Kentucky’s punishments for possession are less severe than many states, with possession of up to eight ounces carrying a maximum sentence of 45 days in jail and a fine of up to $250.

 

Louisiana

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Until the summer of 2019, Louisiana’s medical marijuana program was restricted to non-smokable marijuana products. However, the program has now expanded and a growing number of pharmacies and dispensaries now sell marijuana flowers. Louisiana residents can be granted a medical marijuana permit by licensed physicians.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal, but punishments are somewhat lenient. Possession can be punished by up to 25 days in jail and a maximum fine of $300. Those caught with 2.5 pounds of marijuana or more can face up to 2.5 years in jail and fines of up to $10,000.

 

Maine

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Recreational marijuana became legal in Maine as of 2016. You can possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana legally in the state for recreational use, and purchase it at any licensed dispensary without a permit. You just need to prove that you are 21 or older with a valid government issued ID.

Residents of Maine are allowed to cultivate up to 7 marijuana plants.

 

Maryland

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

Maryland’s medical marijuana program allows residents to get a medical permit from a licensed physician, enabling them to possess a one month supply of four ounces of marijuana and purchase it from a number of licensed dispensaries within the state.

While recreational marijuana remains illegal, possession of 10 grams or less has been decriminalized, making it a civil violation with a maximum fine of $100. Possession of more than 10 grams remains a misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of one year in jail and fines up to $1,000. 

 

Massachusetts

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Massachusetts legalized recreational marijuana in 2016. Adults 21 and older can now purchase marijuana from recreational dispensaries with no permit, requiring only a valid government ID as proof of age. 

Possession of up to one ounce of marijuana is legal outside of the home, while Massachusetts residents can have up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their home and cultivate a maximum of six plants, with three flowering and three vegetating at any time.

 

Michigan

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Michigan legalized recreational marijuana in 2018, with the first recreational dispensaries expected to open up in 2020. This will allow any adult 21 years or older with a valid government issued ID to purchase marijuana with no permit.

You’re allowed to transport up to one ounce of marijuana within the state, or hold up to 10 ounces in your home.

Residents of Michigan may also cultivate up to 12 marijuana plants per household.

 

Minnesota

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

Minnesota’s medical marijuana program allows doctors to issue permits which enable patients to purchase as much as 2.5 ounces of marijuana from any of the state’s licensed dispensaries. Permit holders may also cultivate up to 12 marijuana plants on their property.

Minnesota was one of the earliest states to pass marijuana decriminalization, with a law dating back to 1974 which makes possession of 42.5 or less grams a petty misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum fine of $200. Possession of 42.5 or more grams is a felony with a maximum sentence of five years in jail and fines of up to $5,000.

 

Mississippi

  • Recreational Use: Ilegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Mississippi’s extremely restricted medical marijuana program only covers CBD, allowing products with up to 15% CBD to be recommended by a doctor for a limited number of conditions. These CBD products can only be purchased at two universities within the state.

Recreational use remains illegal, but a limited decriminalization is in effect. First time offenders with 30 grams or less can only be fined a maximum of $200, but repeat offenses result in a misdemeanor with potential jail time.

 

Missouri

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

In 2018, Missouri relaxed some of the restrictions on its medical marijuana program, which had previously been limited strictly to terminally ill patients. Missouri residents can now be approved for a medical marijuana permit by licensed physicians who determine them to have “chronic or debilitating medical conditions,” enabling them to possess up to 4 ounces of marijuana, purchase it from licensed state dispensaries, and cultivate up to 6 marijuana plants.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal. It is a Class A misdemeanor with a maximum jail sentence of 1 year and fines up to $1,000.

 

Montana

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Ilegal

Montana’s medical program allows residents to be approved by a licensed physician for a medical marijuana permit, enabling them to possess as much as one ounce of marijuana and purchase from the state’s licensed medical dispensaries. Medical marijuana users may also cultivate up to 12 plants, with a maximum of 4 flowering at any time.

Recreational use remains illegal, carrying a maximum sentence of six months and fines of up to $500 for anyone in possession of 60 grams or less.

 

Nebraska

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Ilegal

Nebraska has no medical marijuana program and is an unlikely candidate for legalizing recreational marijuana. 

While marijuana remains illegal across the board in Nebraska, their laws do have a limited decriminalization. Possession of up to one ounce is punishable by a fine of up to $300 for a first offense. Second time offenders can face up to $500 in fines and five days in jail, while third time offenders face up to $500 in fines and a week in jail.

 

Nevada

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Nevada made recreational marijuana use legal in 2017, allowing anyone 21 year or older to purchase marijuana without a permit from any of the state’s numerous dispensaries. You can possess up to one ounce of marijuana. A valid government ID is required as proof of age.

Nevada residents may also cultivate up to six marijuana plants, provided their household is 25 miles or more away from a marijuana dispensary.

 

New Hampshire

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

New Hampshire’s medical marijuana program allows licensed physicians to approve patients for medical marijuana permits, enabling them to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana purchased from one of the state’s licensed medical dispensaries.

In 2017 New Hampshire passed decriminalization laws, limiting punishments to fines of $100 for first time offenders, $200 for second time offenders, and $300 for third time offenders. Four offenses within three years are still categorized as a misdemeanor. 

 

New Jersey

  • Recreational Use: Illegal
  • Medical Use: Legal

New Jersey’s medical marijuana program allows residents to be approved by a licensed physician for a medical marijuana permit, enabling them to possess up to 2 ounces per month purchased from a licensed state medical dispensary.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal. Possession of up to 50 grams of marijuana can be punished with a maximum of one year in prison and fines of up to $1,000.

 

New Mexico

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

New Mexico’s medical marijuana program allows residents to be approved by a licensed physician for a medical marijuana permit. This permit enables them to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana, which can be purchased from one of the state’s many licensed medical dispensaries. Permit holders can also cultivate up to 16 marijuana plants, with a maximum of 4 flowering at any time.

Recreational marijuana use was decriminalized in 2019. First time possession of a half ounce or less is a petty misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum fine of $50.

 

New York

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized) 
  • Medical Use: Legal

New York’s limited medical marijuana program prohibits smokable marijuana. Residents can be approved by a licensed physician for a medical marijuana permit, which enables them to purchase marijuana products including edibles, oils, pills, and vaporizable materials to be purchased from a state dispensary, but no raw marijuana flower.

In 2019 New York passed a decriminalization bill, making possession of one ounce or less punishable by a maximum $50 fine, with possession of 2 ounces or less punishable by a maximum $100 fine.

 

North Carolina

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal (CBD Products Only)

North Carolina’s limited medical marijuana program allows residents to obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician. However, the program does not allow for smokable marijuana. Medical marijuana patients are limited to cannabis extract containing 5% or less CBD and up to 0.9% THC.

Recreational use remain illegal in North Carolina, but the state decriminalized marijuana possession of up to a half ounce in 1977. Possession still carries a misdemeanor charge, but punishable only with a maximum fine of $500.

 

North Dakota

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Legal

North Dakota passed a medical marijuana bill in 2016, allowing residents to be approved by a licensed physician to obtain a medical marijuana permit for certain conditions. This permit allows patients to possess up to 3 ounces of marijuana purchased from one of the state’s licensed dispensaries. 

Possession up to 0.5 ounces of marijuana without a medical permit is a Class A Misdemeanor punishable by up to one month in jail and fines of up to $1,000.

 

Ohio

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

Ohio legalized medical marijuana in 2016, with the first medical dispensaries opening in 2019. However, smokable marijuana remains illegal under Ohio’s medical marijuana program, limiting patients to using oils, edibles, tinctures, and vaporizable marijuana products. Sufferers of a variety of conditions can obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician, which allows them to purchase a one month’s supply of medical marijuana products from one of the state’s dispensaries.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal in Ohio, but has been decriminalized. Possession of up to 100 grams is a minor misdemeanor punishable by a maximum fine of $150.

 

Oklahoma

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Legal

Oklahoma legalized medical marijuana in 2018. Their medical marijuana program allows residents to obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician for a number of conditions. Medical marijuana patients can possess up to 3 ounces of marijuana. Marijuana can be purchased from one of the state’s licensed dispensaries, or patients can cultivate up to twelve plants with a maximum of six flowering at any time.

Possession of marijuana for those without a medical permit can carry steep fines and jail time for any amount. In one famous example, a Tulsa man was sentenced on felony possession charges to life in prison for possessing less than one gram (0.16g) of marijuana in 1992. 

 

Oregon

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Recreational marijuana is legal across the board in Oregon. The first state to decriminalize marijuana in 1973, Oregon has long been a leader in progressive marijuana policy, legalizing recreational use in 2015.

You can possess up to one ounce of marijuana in Oregon, which can be purchased without a permit at any of the state’s numerous dispensaries by adults 21 years or older with a valid government ID. Oregon residents can cultivate up to four marijuana plants for recreational use. 

 

Pennsylvania

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Legal

Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana program allows residents to obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician. Until 2018, medical marijuana was restricted to non-smokable products, but this requirement was repealed. Medical marijuana patients can obtain up to a 30-day supply of medical marijuana products from state licensed dispensaries.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal in Pennsylvania, with possession of up to 30 grams or less carrying a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail and up to $1,000 in fines.

 

Rhode Island

  • Recreational Use: Illegal (Decriminalized)
  • Medical Use: Legal

Rhode Island’s medical marijuana program came into effect in 2006, allowing residents to acquire a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician. This permit allows patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and cultivate as many as 12 plants.

Recreational marijuana use remains illegal in Rhode Island, but the state has decriminalized marijuana possession. Possession of less than an ounce of marijuana is classified as a civil violation with a maximum fine of $150.

 

South Carolina

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Marijuana remains illegal across the board in South Carolina. In 2014, an extremely limited medical marijuana program was approved, allowing children with severe epilepsy to be prescribed CBD oil containing 0.9% or less THC.

Possession of up to one ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor in South Carolina, carrying a maximum sentence of 30 days in jail.

 

South Dakota

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal

South Dakota has maintained a hostile position towards marijuana use, being one of the few states with no medical marijuana program at all.

Possession of marijuana for any reason remains illegal in South Dakota, with possession of 2 ounces or less classified as a Class A misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and maximum fines of $2,000.

 

Tennessee

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Tennessee’s highly limited medical marijuana program only allows CBD oils to be used by patients with epilepsy if recommended by their physician. 

Possessing marijuana for any reason is illegal in Tennessee, classified as a misdemeanor. First and second time offenders can be punished with up to a year probation, with harsher sentences for repeat offenders.

 

Texas

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Texas enacted a limited medical marijuana bill which allowed CBD to be sold to epilepsy patients with a doctor’s recommendation in 2015. In 2019 this bill was expanded to cover other conditions, including Parkinson’s Disease, ALS, and terminal cancer, among other conditions. However, the limited number of dispensaries has made it very difficult for permitted patients to find CBD products.

Recreational use of marijuana remains illegal in Texas. While cities such as Houston, Dallas, and Austin (among others,) have enacted a “cite and release” policy to reduce the number of marijuana arrests, possession of up to two ounces of marijuana can still result in a maximum sentence of six months in jail and fines up to $2,000 in most of the state.

 

Utah

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Utah’s limited medical marijuana program allows patients suffering from epilepsy and terminal conditions to purchase cannabis oils containing up to 15% CBD and 0.3% or less THC to be purchased under the recommendation of a doctor. 

Possession of marijuana for any reason remains illegal in Utah and carries a maximum sentence of six months in prison and fines up to $10,000 for up to one ounce.

 

Vermont

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

Vermont legalized recreational marijuana in 2018, making it legal to possess up to one ounce or the yield from two large plants. Vermont residents can cultivate up to six plants, with a maximum of two flowering plants at any time.

Recreational marijuana can be purchased at state dispensaries by anyone 21 years or older with no permit. A valid government ID is required as proof of age.

 

Virginia

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Virginia’s limited medical marijuana program allows residents to obtain a medical permit from a licensed physician. However, tight restrictions on the types of cannabis product which can be sold limit this program to oils containing no more than 5% THC.

Recreational marijuana use remains illegal in Virginia. A first offense carries a maximum of 30 days in jail and a $500 fine.

 

Washington

  • Recreational Use: Legal 
  • Medical Use: Legal

Washington state was one of the first states to legalize marijuana in 2012. Anyone over the age of 21 can possess up to one ounce of marijuana and purchase it from one of the state’s numerous dispensaries with no permit, requiring only a valid government ID as proof of age.

Recreational marijuana cultivation is still illegal in Washington, but those with a medical permit may cultivate their own plants.

 

Washington, D.C.

  • Recreational Use: Legal
  • Medical Use: Legal

The nation’s capital has its own laws regarding marijuana, separate from surrounding Virginia and Maryland. Medical and recreational marijuana are legal in Washington, D.C., allowing anyone over the age of 21 to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and cultivate up to six plants, with as many as three flowering at any time.

Recreational marijuana can be purchased from dispensaries with no permit. A valid government ID is required as proof of age.

 

West Virginia

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Legal

West Virginia’s medical marijuana program was passed into law in 2017, but no permits were issued until 2019. Residents can obtain a medical marijuana permit from a licensed physician, enabling them to purchase up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable cannabis products such as pills, ointments, tinctures, oils, and vaporizer products from licensed state dispensaries.

Recreational marijuana remains illegal in West Virginia. Possession of any amount is a misdemeanor and can carry a maximum sentence of 6 months in jail and fines up to $1,000.

 

Wisconsin

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Wisconsin’s medical marijuana program applies only to CBD products which can be recommended by a doctor for a small number of conditions. However, a lack of dispensaries has made access to CBD products in Wisconsin extremely rare, even for those with a valid medical permit.

Possession of marijuana for any reason remains illegal in Wisconsin. First time possession is a misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of 6 months in jail and fines up to $1,000. Second time possession is a Class I felony with a maximum sentence of 3.5 years in jail and fines up to $10,000.

 

Wyoming

  • Recreational Use: Illegal 
  • Medical Use: Illegal (CBD Products Only)

Wyoming’s limited medical marijuana program allows patients to purchase CBD products containing 0.3% or less THC when recommended by a licensed physician. However, the state has not provided any infrastructure for dispensaries or methods to obtain these products, making the program effectively non-functional.

Wyoming’s marijuana laws remain strict. Being under the influence of marijuana is a misdemeanor which can carry a sentence of up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $100. Possession of three ounces or less is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in jail and fines up to $1,000.